Mulford Farm, ca. 1680

Mulford Farm, ca. 1680

10 James Lane, East Hampton, NY , 11937 Map
631-324-6850
  • The Mulford House is open Memorial Day weekend through Columbus Day weekend; Farm open daily
  • Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Sunday, noon - 5 p.m., or by appointment
  • Admission: $4 adults / $3 those over 65 / $2 students
  • EHHS Members Free

About The Museum

The Mulford Farm, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is considered one of America's most significant, intact, English Colonial farmsteads.

The farm is of interest not merely because of its importance to the history of East Hampton, but because of its antiquity.  Viewed as an artifact that has been shaped to fit the needs and the pleasure of those who have lived in it, the house itself has much to tell us about the origins of Colonial New England society and the changes that still affect our lives today.

The 1680 Mulford House represents one of the most important and complex artifacts produced by our culture -- the family home.

The survival of this house, built in 1680, is remarkable since it has been left largely unchanged since 1750.  The majority of the framing and wood members of the house have been left undisturbed, enabling scholars to tell the story of the successive changes over time.

In addition to the house's architectural significance, the home has remained in the Mulford hands for the majority of its existence giving scholars the opportunity to trace the family, their use of the land and structures around them.  The lives and spirit of this family echo throughout the house, which was restored using period appropriate furnishings and authentic decorative arts.

The Mulford Barn, constructed in 1721, is one of the most intact early-18th-century English-plan barn forms in New York State and is recognized as an outstanding example of early-18th-century construction methods and materials.

The location of the barn also provides insight into the history of settlement patterns in this region of New York.  The Mulford Barn was evaluated by the State Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in 1990 and deemed the second most important 18th-century barn in New York State.

Osborn-Jackson House, ca. 1720

Osborn-Jackson House, ca. 1720

101 Main Street, East Hampton, NY , 11937 Map
631-324-6850
  • Open year round
  • Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
  • Suggested Donation: $4 adults / $3 those over 65 / $2 students
  • EHHS Members Free

About The Museum

The Osborn-Jackson House, named for its first and last owners, was lived in by six generations of Osborns until the late 1960s.

The original portion of the house, probably built in 1723, was the family home of "Deacon" Daniel Osborn.  His son Jonathan inherited the house and made additions in 1760.  The house was owned successively by his sons Joseph and Sylvanus, his grandson Edward E. Gardiner, and their descendants until the mid-20th century.

This Colonial house, one of the few still in its original position on Main Street, is owned and maintained by the Village of East Hampton.  Lionel Jackson donated the property to the Village of East Hampton in 1977 for use as a museum.  It serves as the headquarters for the East Hampton Historical Society and a period house museum for the general public.

The museum features a display of furnishings typical of the well-to-do lifestyle of a post-Colonial East End family.  Highlights of the exhibition include a tall clock, a high chest, candle stands, and chairs built in the East Hampton workshop of the Dominy family of craftsmen between 1780 and 1840.

Clinton Academy, 1784

Clinton Academy, 1784

151 Main Street, East Hampton, NY , 11937 Map
631-324-6850
  • Opens 31 May 2014 until 25 July, and reopens 26 July through Columbus Day weekend.
  • Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Sunday, noon - 5 p.m., or by appointment
  • Admission is free but contributions are appreciated.

About The Museum

Clinton Academy was one of the first academies in New York State chartered by the Board of Regents.  The academy was constructed in 1784 with funds contributed by local citizens at the request of the Rev. Samuel Buell, the pastor of the East Hampton Presbyterian Church.

This remarkable academy was a co-educational institution preparing young men for college or for careers such as seafaring or surveying.  Young women were schooled in spiritual reading and the finer points of being a lady.

The first headmaster, Reverend Buell, gave instruction in Latin as well as Greek and French.  Students came from a broad range of places including Long Island, New York City, New Jersey, and Connecticut as well as from the West Indies.

After the state dissolved the chartered academy system, Clinton became a community center, a playhouse, town offices, and briefly housed The East Hampton Star.

This late Georgian-style building was restored in 1921 by Lorenzo E. Woodhouse.  Visitors can enjoy the Mimi Meehan Native Plant Garden behind the property, a project of the Garden Club of East Hampton.

East Hampton Town Marine Museum

East Hampton Town Marine Museum

301 Bluff Road, Amagansett, NY , 11930 Map
631-324-6850
  • Opens Saturday, 26 April 2014, through Sunday, 26 October
  • Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Sunday, noon - 5 p.m., or by appointment
  • Admission: $4 adults / $3 those over 65 / $2 students
  • EHHS Members Free

About The Museum

The Marine Museum tells the unique story of Long Island's East End community and its relationship with the sea through artifacts, photographs, models, and displays.

Three floors of exhibitions are characterized by a thoughtful interpretation of historical research and the perspective of the men who work on the water every day of their lives.

The museum is dedicated to documenting and preserving East Hampton Town's maritime history and to showing in what ways our marine environment has had an impact on the economic, social, and recreational life of its citizens.

New is the Claus Hoie Gallery of Whaling, a permanent exhibtion of paintings by Claus Hoie, an East Hampton painter, that depict the story of a 19th-century whaling expedition that set sail from Sag Harbor.

Town House, ca. 1785

Town House, ca. 1785

149 Main Street, East Hampton, NY , 11937 Map
631-324-6850
  • Opens Memorial Day weekend through Columbus Day weekend and for exhibitions
  • Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. / Sunday, noon - 5 p.m. / or by appointment
  • Admission is free.

About The Museum

Unique among Long Island buildings, the Town House is the only existing town government meeting place to survive from the Colonial period on Long Island.

The Town Trustees who met there determined the affairs of the township by collecting taxes, passing local laws, administering public lands, maintaining the church and schoolhouse, and hiring the minister and teacher.

The Town House is the earliest surviving one-room schoolhouse on Long Island.  Studies were very basic:  reading, writing, and enough arithmetic to keep an accounts book.  Teachers rarely had a very extensive education and there were virtually no textbooks or paper to use; learning was accomplished by copying on slate.

After 1845, the building continued to be used as a meeting place for the Town Trustees.  It was later used as a barbershop, an interior decorator's studio, and the town welfare headquarters during the Depression.  In 1958, the East Hampton Historical Society acquired and moved the Town House to a lot adjacent to the Clinton Academy.

Hook Schoolhouse, ca. 1784

Hook Schoolhouse, ca. 1784

151 Main Street, East Hampton, NY , 11937 Map
631-324-6850
  • Opens Memorial Day weekend through Columbus Day weekend
  • Saturday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Sunday, noon - 5 p.m.
  • Admission is free but contributions are appreciated.

About The Museum

This beautiful tiny Georgian designed frame building has been moved about East Hampton Village since it was built almost two and a quarter centuries ago.  Found, several years ago, on North Main Street, this building may have been a school, private library, or lawyer’s office.  Quite elegant in detail and proportion, it was saved from destruction and situated behind our Town House.  It has been restored to reflect mid-18th-century hornbook schooling as well as an unusual desk arrangement that is described in our early town records.